Home Page | » WHY PREPARE ?  |  My Account  |  Cart Contents  |  Checkout | 
We can add your company logo or text on almost all of our products. Please call or email for details
Search
 
Type keywords. At least 3 letters/numbers required.
Survival Supplies
Shipping & Returns
Contact Us
Articles
All Articles (32)
California Earthquake Forecast (1)
Earthquake Preparedness
New York Household Preparedness (7)
Hurricane Information (10)
Bussiness Emergency Plan (7)
Emergency Food Storage Shelf Lif
The Dehydration Process
The Freeze-Dry Process
Wise Food Storage (3)
Emergency Radio
Swine Flu (4)
Partner Sites
Emergency Car Kits
Military Store
Safety Supplies
Promotional Products
Emergency Alerts
At least 30 killed as tornadoes Pounds South 04/29/2014
Magnitude 7.5 earthquake strikes off Papua New Guinea 04/19/2014
MAGNITUDE 7.5 EARTHQUAKE STRIKES MEXICO 04/18/2014
Magnitude-8.2 earthquake hits off Chile 04/01/2014
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake struck CA 03/17/2014
A potent threat of major earthquake off California's northern co 03/13/2014
Drought in California 01/29/2014
Tornadoes, damaging storms sweep across Midwest 11/17/2013
Strongest typhoon of the year hits Philippines 11/08/2013
7.3 magnitude earthquake hits Japan 10/25/2013
The death toll from an earthquake in the Philippines rose to 144 10/17/2013
Tropical Storm Karen headed for U.S. Gulf Coast 10/03/2013
Hurricanes on the Horizon 08/26/2013
Solar Flare poses huge threat 06/27/2013
WHY PREPARE ?

Why Prepare ?

There are real benefits to being prepared.

  • Being prepared can reduce fear, anxiety, and losses that accompany disasters. Communities, families, and individuals should know what to do in the event of a fire and where to seek shelter during a tornado. They should be ready to evacuate their homes and take refuge in public shelters and know how to care for their basic medical needs.
  • People also can reduce the impact of disasters (flood proofing, elevating a home or moving a home out of harm�s way, and securing items that could shake loose in an earthquake) and sometimes avoid the danger completely.

The need to prepare is real.

  • Disasters disrupt hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Each disaster has lasting effects, both to people and property.
  • If a disaster occurs in your community, local government and disaster-relief organizations will try to help you, but you need to be ready as well. Local responders may not be able to reach you immediately, or they may need to focus their efforts elsewhere.
  • You should know how to respond to severe weather or any disaster that could occur in your area - hurricanes, earthquakes, extreme cold, flooding, or terrorism.
  • You should also be ready to be self-sufficient for at least three days. This may mean providing for your own shelter, first aid, food, water, and sanitation.

Using this guide makes preparation practical.

  • This guide was developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which is the agency responsible for responding to national disasters and for helping state and local governments and individuals prepare for emergencies. It contains step-by-step advice on how to prepare for, respond to, and recover from disasters.
  • Used in conjunction with information and instructions from local emergency management offices and the American Red Cross, Are You Ready? will give you what you need to be prepared.

Using Are You Ready? to Prepare

The main reason to use this guide is to help protect yourself and your family in the event of an emergency. Through applying what you have learned in this guide, you are taking the necessary steps to be ready when an event occurs.

Citizen
Every citizen in this country is part of a national emergency management system that is all about protection�protecting people and property from all types of hazards. Think of the national emergency management system as a pyramid with you, the citizen, forming the base of the structure. At this level, you have a responsibility to protect yourself and your family by knowing what to do before, during, and after an event. Some examples of what you can do follow:

Before

  • Know the risks and danger signs.
  • Purchase insurance, including flood insurance, which is not part of your homeowner�s policy.
  • Develop plans for what to do.
  • Assemble a disaster supplies kit.
  • Volunteer to help others.

During

  • Put your plan into action.
  • Help others.
  • Follow the advice and guidance of officials in charge of the event.

After

  • Repair damaged property.
  • Take steps to prevent or reduce future loss.

You will learn more about these and other actions you should take as you progress through this guide.

Local Citizen
It is sometimes necessary to turn to others within the local community for help. The local level is the second tier of the pyramid, and is made up of paid employees and volunteers from the private and public sectors. These individuals are engaged in preventing emergencies from happening and in being prepared to respond if something does occur. Most emergencies are handled at the local level, which puts a tremendous responsibility on the community for taking care of its citizens. Among the responsibilities faced by local officials are:

  • Identifying hazards and assessing potential risk to the community.
  • Enforcing building codes, zoning ordinances, and land-use management programs.
  • Coordinating emergency plans to ensure a quick and effective response.
  • Fighting fires and responding to hazardous materials incidents.
  • Establishing warning systems.
  • Stocking emergency supplies and equipment.
  • Assessing damage and identifying needs.
  • Evacuating the community to safer locations.
  • Taking care of the injured.
  • Sheltering those who cannot remain in their homes.
  • Aiding recovery efforts.

State - Local Citizen
If support and resources are needed beyond what the local level can provide, the community can request assistance from the state. The state may be able to provide supplemental resources such as money, equipment, and personnel to close the gap between what is needed and what is available at the local level. The state also coordinates the plans of the various jurisdictions so that activities do not interfere or conflict with each other. To ensure personnel know what to do and efforts are in agreement, the state may offer a program that provides jurisdictions the opportunity to train and exercise together.

Federal Government - State - Local Citizen
At the top of the pyramid is the federal government, which can provide resources to augment state and local efforts. These resources can be in the form of:

  • Public educational materials, such as this guide, that can be used to prepare the public for protecting itself from hazards.
  • Financial grants for equipment, training, exercises, personnel, and programs.
  • Grants and loans to help communities respond to and recover from disasters so severe that the President of the United States has deemed them beyond state and local capabilities.
  • Research findings that can help reduce losses from disaster.
  • Technical assistance to help build stronger programs.

The national emergency management system is built on shared responsibilities and active participation at all levels of the pyramid. The whole system begins with you, the citizen, and your ability to follow good emergency management practices� whether at home, work, or other locations.

Continue

Our Customers

Shopping Cart
0 items
Information
Testimonials
Custom Auto Kits
Custom Logo Imprint
Car Emergency Phone
WHY PREPARE ?
Emergency Kits
Natural Disasters
Earthquake Survival
Earthquake Survial Tips
Flood Preparedness
Tornado Preparedness
Hurricane Preparedness
Thunderstorms Preparedness
Winter Storm Preparedness
Surviving Heat
Landslides Preparedness
Surviving Tsunamis
Fire Survival
Wildfire Survival
Volcano Survival
Hazardous Materials Incidents
Household Chemical Emergencies
Nuclear Power Plants
Terrorism
Explosion Survival
Survival Bio Terrorism
Survival Chemical Atack
Surviving Nuclear Blast
Dirty Bomb Atack
Homeland Security
Disaster Recovery
Disaster Kit Check List
About Fire: The Nature of Fire
Home Fire Prevention
Bedroom Fire Safety
Heating Fire Safety
Electrical Fire Safety
Holiday Fire Prevention
Smoke Alarms
The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide
Portable Generator Hazards
Escape Planning
Afer a fire - The First 24 Hours
Replacing Documents & Records
After a fire - Valuing Your Property
First Aid Kits
Discount First Aid Kits
Emergency Preparedness
Emergency Preparedness - State by State
Homeland Security Grant Program
24/7/365 Roadside assistance Program
Art work guide
Privacy Policy
Links
Resources
Site Map

Copyright © 2003-2013 www.survival-supply.com